Edmund Burke Speech He Is A Member Of Parliament

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Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament
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Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament
He is a Member of Parliament
by Edmund Burke, Bristol Guildhall
3 November 1774

I owe myself, in all things, to all the freemen of this city. My particular friends have a demand on me that I should not deceive their expectations. Never was cause or man supported with more constancy, more activity, more spirit. I have been supported with a zeal indeed and heartiness in my friends which (if their object had been at all proportioned to their endeavours) could never be sufficiently commended. They supported me upon the most liberal principles. They wished that the members for Bristol should be chosen for the city, and for their country at large, and not for themselves.

Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament

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So far they are not disappointed. If I possess nothing else, I am sure I possess the temper that is fit for your service. I know nothing of Bristol but by the favours I have received and the virtues I have seen exerted in it.

I shall ever retain, what I now feel, the most perfect and grateful attachment to my friends – and I have no enemies, no resentment. I never can consider fidelity to engagements and constancy in friendships but with the highest approbation, even when those noble qualities are employed against my own pretensions. The gentleman who is not fortunate as I have been in this contest, enjoys in this respect a consolation full of honour both to himself and to his friends. They have certainly left nothing undone for his service.

As for the trifling petulance which the rage of party stirs up in little minds, though it should show itself even in this court, it has not made the slightest impression on me. The highest flight of such clamorous birds is winged in an inferior region of the air. We hear them and we look upon them just as you, gentlemen, look down upon the gulls which skim the mud of your river when it is exhausted of its tide.

I am sorry I cannot conclude without saying a word on a topic touched upon by my worthy colleague. I wish that topic had been passed by at a time when I have so little leisure to discuss it. But since he has thought proper to throw it out, I owe you a clear explanation of my poor sentiments on that subject.

He tells you that “the topic of instructions has occasioned much altercation and uneasiness in this city”; and he expresses himself (if I understand him rightly) in favour of the coercive authority of instructions,

Certainly, gentlemen, it ought to be the happiness and glory of a representative to live in the strictest union, the closest correspondence, and the most unreserved communication with his constituents. Their wishes ought to have great weight with his; their opinion high respect; their business unremitted attention. It is his duty to sacrifice his repose, his pleasures, his satisfactions, to theirs; and, above all, ever, and in all cases, to prefer their interest to his own.

But his unbiased opinion, his mature judgement, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you – to any man, or to any set of men living. These he does not derive from your pleasure; no, nor from the law and the constitution. They are a trust from Providence, for the abuse of which he is deeply answerable. Your representative owes you, not his industry only, but his judgement; and he betrays, instead of serving, you if he sacrifices it to your opinion.

My worthy colleague says his will ought to be subservient to yours. If that be all, the thing is innocent. If government were a matter of will upon any side, yours, without question, ought to be superior. But government and legislation are matters of reason and judgement, and not of inclination; and what sort of reason is that in which the determination precedes the discussion? In which one set of men deliberate, and another decide? And where those who form the conclusion are perhaps three hundred miles distant from those who hear the arguments?

To deliver an opinion is the right of all men; that of constituents is a weighty and respectable opinion, which a representative ought always to rejoice to hear, and which he ought always most serious to consider. But authoritative instructions, mandates issued which the member is bound blindly and implicitly to obey, to vote and to argue for, though contrary to the clearest conviction of his judgement and conscience: these are things utterly unknown to the laws of this land, and which arise from a fundamental mistake of the whole order and tenor of our constitution.

Parliament is not a congress of ambassadors from different and hostile interests, which interests each must maintain, as an agent and advocate, against other agents and advocates; but Parliament is a deliberative assembly of one nation with one interest – that of the whole: where, not local purposes, not local prejudices ought to guide, but the general good, resulting from the general reason of the whole. You choose a member, indeed; but when you have chosen him, he is not a member of Bristol, but he is a member of Parliament. If the local constituent should have an interest or should form a hasty opinion, evidently opposite to the real good of the rest of the community, the member for that place ought to be as far, as any other, from any endeavour to give it effect. I beg pardon for saying so much on this subject. I have been unwillingly drawn into it, but I shall ever use a respectful frankness of communication with you. Your faithful friend, your devoted servant, I shall be to the end of my life; a flatterer you do not wish for.

Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament

Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament

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  • Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament

Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament

Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament
The text featured is in the form of extracts, passages or lines from the Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament, an example of a great speaker. This famous Edmund Burke Speech is a great example of a clear address using excellent text to persuade and inspire the audience, a natural leader, speaker and motivator. Use this famous transcript of the Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament as an example of a great speaker, oration and clear dialogue. This famous transcript of the Edmund Burke Speech originated from a historical manuscript. A Quote or extract from the Edmund Burke Speech, provides an illustration of, or allusion to, the famous events the era and the work of a great speaker. This famous Edmund Burke Speech is famed for its great powers of verbal communication making good use of the words and language to illustrate the subject all critical requirements of a great speaker. Whether this address can be described in the category of powerful, persuasive, motivational or inspirational the excellent powers of oration which are used make it one of the most famous speeches from a great speaker.

Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament
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Edmund Burke Speech - He Is A Member Of Parliament

 

 
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